The fifth (2016) Kiyoko and Paul Bourdarie-Goto "Scientific Prize"

April 17, 2017


The fifth (2016) Kiyoko and Paul Bourdarie-Goto "Scientific Prize"
Winner Dr. Hidemi Ito, M.D., Ph.D.
Section Chief of Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute
Paper Nonfilter and filter cigarette consumption and the incidence of lung cancer by histological type in Japan and the United States: analysis of 30-year data from population-based cancer registries. (International Journal of Cancer. 2011; 128(8): 19)
Reason that
Dr. Hidemi Ito received this prize
Dr. Ito and her research colleagues analyzed relations of nonfiltered and filtered cigarette consumption with the incidence of lung cancer by histological type, based on large-scale database from Japan (cancer registry) and the United States (SEER). They observed that the most common histological type of lung cancer changed from squamous cell carcinoma to adenocarcinoma in both Japan and the US. They also proved positive correlations to exist between the amount of filtered cigarette consumption and the incidence of adenocarcinoma, and between the amount of nonfiltered cigarette consumption and the incidence of squamous cell carcinoma.
The fifth (2016) Kiyoko and Paul Bourdarie-Goto "Scientific Prize - Special Award"
Winner Dr. Koichi Takayama, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine
Paper Anamorelin (ONO-7643) in Japanese patients with non-small cell lung cancer and cachexia: results of a randomized phase 2 trial. (Support Care Cancer 2016 Aug; 24 (8): 3495-505.)
Reason that
Dr. Koichi Takayama received this prize
Dr. Takayama and his research colleagues proved anamorelin to be an effective appetite promoter for patients with cachexia caused by progressive cancer. As lung cancer and/or other malignancies progress, various issues arise compromising patient quality of life (QOL) and shortening survival. Appetite loss contributes to these effects in all forms of cancer. The observation by Dr. Takayama and his colleagues provides insights into establishing effective palliative therapy. The Foundation gave this paper a very high evaluation because the authors conducted this research, the results of which are applicable to clinical use by many Japanese hospitals and medical facilities, and they obtained their conclusion employing a randomized comparative study design, although similar research results were published prior to Dr. Takayama’s paper.